blacklisting rule–

blacklisting rule–20lh.,b12-1— the hill-

President Trump repealed the so-called “blacklisting rule” Monday that required federal contractors to disclose labor violations.

The Obama-era rule was intended to prevent the government from contracting with businesses responsible for wage theft or workplace safety violations at any point within the last three years. But business groups feared it gave unions the upper hand at the bargaining table.

Trump struck down the blacklisting rule, along with three other regulations aimed at protecting the environment and students, Monday afternoon during a White House signing ceremony.

The other regulations Trump overturned include the Interior Department’s land use rule, as well as Education Department’s rules for teacher preparation and school accountability. Republicans lawmakers voted to strike down these regulations through the Congressional Review Act, which allows certain regulations to be undone with only a simple majority in the Senate.

Since January, Trump has repealed seven regulations under the Congressional Review Act, with more expected in the coming weeks.

The Obama-era rule was intended to prevent the government from contracting with businesses responsible for wage theft or workplace safety violations at any point within the last three years. But business groups feared it gave unions the upper hand at the bargaining table.

Employers were particularly concerned about the blacklisting rule. “The rule violated the due process rights of contractors by forcing them to report mere allegations of misconduct — which are often frivolous and filed with nefarious intentions by special interest groups,” said Ben Brubeck, vice president of regulatory affairs at the Associated Builders and Contractors.

“The message Donald Trump is sending today is that there are no consequences for companies who break American Labor law,” said Joseph Geevarghese, executive director of Good Jobs Nation, which is part of the movement lobbying for a $15 federal minimum wage.

President Obama’s executive order calling for the blacklisting rule was partly inspired by the Chemical Safety Board, an independent agency that recommended “additional contractor responsibility” in a 2013 report. Republicans lawmakers voted to strike down these regulations through the Congressional Review Act, which allows certain regulations to be undone while preventing the minority in the Senate from using the filibuster.

Amit Narang, regulatory policy advocate at the left-leaning Public Citizen, accused Republicans of challenging “every rule under the sun.” James Goodwin, senior regulatory policy analyst at the Center for Progressive Reform, criticized GOP lawmakers for the “orgy of Congressional Review Act resolutions” they are sending to Trump.

“It’s an incredibly reckless approach to congressional oversight,” Goodwin said. “We’re talking about rules that have been in the works for four, five, six, seven years. They’re lining them up for repeal, even though they probably have no idea what they do or which agency they came from.”

Sam Batkins, director of regulatory policy at the conservative American Action Forum, admitted the Congressional Review Act is a “pretty blunt instrument,” because it not only repeals these regulations, but it also prohibits future presidents from issuing similar rules. What has surprised Batkins and other conservatives are the number of obscure rules Congress is repealing this way.

“One thing I was struck by is that some of the regulations being repealed are not things that were on my radar,” said Susan Dudley, the former administrator of the White House’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs under President George W. Bush.

President Trump and the Republican-led Congress are using a special rule to do away with many of President Obama’s regulations. Since Trump entered the White House two months ago, the House has passed 14 resolutions disapproving of Obama-era regulations under the Congressional Review Act (CRA). The Senate has approved 10 resolutions, and President Trump has signed three measures into law. The White House has indicated Trump intends to sign all of the measures approved by Congress with the use of the CRA. The deadline for Trump to sign these repeals is May 9.

The Security and Exchange Commission’s resource extraction rule issued last July requires oil companies to disclose payments of more than $100,000 made to foreign governments.

The Interior Department’s stream protection rule prohibits coal miners from setting up shop within 100 feet of streams, rivers, or lakes. Democrats say the rule will protect groundwater, but Republicans see it as another example Obama’s so-called “War on Coal.” This was the first disapproval resolution passed by the current Congress, but the second one that Trump signed, on Feb. 16.

The Social Security Administration’s gun regulation requires the agency to report disability beneficiaries who it believes are mentally ill to the FBI’s background check system. Gun control supporters say this will keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people. But the National Rifle Association says it violates the Second Amendment and the due process rights of disability beneficiaries, who may be targeted by the government even though they are not be a danger to society. Trump signed a measure repealing the rule on Feb. 28.

Congress has voted to repeal another seven regulations, five of which have been sent to the White House and are awaiting Trump’s signature.

The “blacklisting” rule requires federal contractors to report labor violations. It was a joint rule issued by the Defense DepartmentGeneral Services Administration and NASA. Democrats hope the rule will discourage the federal government from doing business with companies that treat their employees poorly. But Republicans say unions could use this information to “blackmail” federal contractors during labor negotiations. Congress voted to repeal the rule on March 6, but it didn’t arrive on Trump’s desk until 10 days later.

The Education Department’s school accountability rule would hold states responsible for providing “every child, regardless of race, income, background, or where they live” with a “high-quality education.” Democrats say the rule protects students who live in low-income neighborhoods who might otherwise receive a poor education. But Republicans argue states should have the final decision on how to best educate their students. Congress voted to repeal the rule on March 9, and sent it to Trump’s desk on March 16.

The Education Department’s teacher preparation standards would measure the performance of educators. Congress voted to strike down the rule on March 8, and sent it to Trump on March 16.

The Interior Department’s predator control regulations would apply to national wildlife refuges in Alaska. Congress voted to overturn the rule on March 21, but has yet to send it to Trump.

(OSHA) last December finalized new requirements for construction and manufacturing companies to maintain records of workplace-related injuries and illnesses. Congress voted to repeal the rule on March 22, but has yet to send it to Trump. The House has passed another four disapproval resolutions under the Congressional Review Act and the Senate has passed one, which the other chamber must still vote on.

The Interior Department’s rule for methane and natural gas is intended to limit emissions. The House voted to repeal the rule on Feb. 3, but the Senate has yet to take it up.

The Labor Department issued two rules for government state retirement savings plans. The House voted to overturn those regulations on Feb. 15, but the Senate has yet to take up the legislation.

The Department of Health and Human Services last December issued new healthcare protections for women. The House voted to repeal the rule on Feb. 16, but the Senate has yet to consider the bill.

The Federal Communication Commission’s internet privacy rules would prohibit service providers from selling information about the online search histories of their customers without their permission. The Senate voted to strike down the rule on March 23, but the House has yet to take it up.

Republicans have also introduced at least 14 other disapproval resolutions under the CRA that neither chamber has voted on, which could be taken up in the near future.

source-the hill, ben brubeck, good jobs nation, joseph geevarghese, center for progressive reform, amit narang, james goodwin, sam batkins, susan dudley, cra, osha

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